This is an excerpt of the book Processing Creativity: The Tools, Practices And Habits Used To Make Music You’re Happy With. If you would like to download an excerpt or buy a copy you can do so here

A thought I’ve had for the past decade is that my job title of record producer might be inaccurate. In nearly any other profession where the term “producer” is used it's applied to someone charged with overseeing or clerical work. What the modern record producer does is more similar to what's called a creative director in the graphic design, film, fashion, advertising, media or entertainment industries. I know this well since my father held this job title in the advertising world for over forty years.

Most record producers spend each day helping musicians get past creative hurdles while establishing a process that'll help get the best song from an artist. We figure out how to convey the artist's vision while staying within their limitations (budget, musicians, technology, etc.). Since producers commonly make more music than the artists, it's their job to have experience figuring out the best practices that lead to better creative outcomes, while avoiding commonly made mistakes. In my practice as a record producer, the work has been much more than budget allocation and hiring duties that producers in film, advertising and many other fields get charged with. The creative development record producers do each day sounds much more like the job title of a creative director.

This is an excerpt of the book Processing Creativity: The Tools, Practices And Habits Used To Make Music You’re Happy With. If you would like to download an excerpt or buy a copy you can do so here.