This is an excerpt of the book Processing Creativity: The Tools, Practices And Habits Used To Make Music You’re Happy With. If you would like to download an excerpt or buy a copy you can do so here.

Before we get to the fun part, it's important to quickly establish some working definitions, since these words are used in poor context throughout the content farms of the internet today. There are also some terms that are academic or only used in the music business that may be helpful to understand.

Creativity - The use of the imagination, especially in the production of a new artistic work.

Emotional Resonance - The amount of emotion we feel when reacting to a performance of a song. This resonance can be a feeling of apathy when hearing a badly performed cover of a song you enjoy or a dancing frenzy when a song compels you.

Epiphany - A sudden realization of great truth that connects concepts you didn’t see a connection between before.

Fluency - The ability to express oneself easily and articulately.

Innovation - A new method, idea or product that's commonly accepted to possess new traits and purposes.

Intent - A purpose you’re pursuing, such as the expression of an emotion or idea.

Trusting Your Gut - When you hear a flaw in a song, you'll feel a slight lack of comfort about it. Trusting to listen to that lack of comfort is trusting your gut.

Perspire/Perspiration - The opposite of inspiration; this is what you create from your inspiration.

Resistance - This is a catchall term for what holds you back from creating.

Riffs (or Beats) - A small part of a song that’s commonly a hook or the basis for further building.

Suits - A&R, record label employees, managers, booking agents and all the other business types who have a concern for your art making money.

Team - As someone with no interest in sports or corporate lingo, this term can be a bit cringeworthy. Trust me, there will be no falling backward so your drummer can catch you in this book. We know how that'll turn out. Sadly, the use of the word team is the best way to describe those you collaborate with, whether it’s band members, studio musicians, your management, producer or A&R, those you discuss your music with are a team, so you should all be on the same side. I use this word since I can't find a better one. If you can find one, please help me out, I'll rewrite this whole book just to get this bad taste out of my mouth.

This is an excerpt of the book Processing Creativity: The Tools, Practices And Habits Used To Make Music You’re Happy With. If you would like to download an excerpt or buy a copy you can do so here.